5+ Best Public Relations Interview Questions & Answers

We’ve compiled the absolute best public relations interview questions and answers to help you in future job interviews. Public relations is a vital part of any company. Generally speaking, public relations is the emotional response a consumer has to a brand. This is built through a variety of tactics and strategies, some of which include press, storytelling, promotions and customer experience development.

Public Relations Interview Questions & Answers

1. What is Public Relations to you?

Public Relations is the act of keeping perspective and positive conservative guidance around a brands image. Brands are more than just what they offer, they are what they stand for. And if the brand seems to stand for something the general public doesn’t relate to, we run into serious risks. This is where public relations can play a major role.

2. How would you build a brands awareness?

Brand awareness can be built by helping clients understand that they need to spend money towards to acknowledgment of their existence. That means more consumers hearing the brands name, seeing the logo, and understanding what they offer. This is how you build brand awareness.

3. What is bad publicity?

Bad publicity is any event which the PR or public relations team was not aware of. This could be something negative that doesn’t connect or directly relate to the image our brand is representing. Although, any press truly is good press.

4. How do you handle working with magazines?

Working with editorial magazines is a powerful way to connect with consumers. Both digital and print magazines are still being consumed by the American public. Working with them on sponsored editorial, advertising placements or even mentions of the brand would be a great way to work with them.

5. What makes a good Public Relations specialist?

A good specialist is someone who truly understands how the American public responds to certain words, phrases, meanings and sometimes related topics. This person really needs to predict future interpretations of massive amounts of people. That can be a cumbersome job and nearly impossible. But as we’ve seen from history, it is possible.

author: patrick algrim
About the author

Patrick Algrim is an experienced executive who has spent a number of years in Silicon Valley hiring and coaching some of the world’s most valuable technology teams. Patrick has been a source for Human Resources and career related insights for Forbes, Glassdoor, Entrepreneur, Recruiter.com, SparkHire, and many more.

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